?

Family 1: Robert DRAKE
  1. +Gilleaire DRAKE

    __
 __|
|  |__
|
|--? 
|
|   __
|__|
   |__

INDEX


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Constantine Heil (HEYL)

Father: Henry (Henricus) Heil (HEYL)
Mother: Anna Maria Christina NEUHAUSER

Family 1: Charlotte KOHLMEYER


                                   _Franciscus HEYL __________
 _Henry (Henricus) Heil (HEYL) ___|
|                                 |_Maria Magdalena ULLMAYER _
|
|--Constantine Heil (HEYL) 
|
|                                  ___________________________
|_Anna Maria Christina NEUHAUSER _|
                                  |___________________________

INDEX


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John T. ATKINS

Family 1: Sarah WHITNEY
  1.  Josephine Victoria ATKINS
  2.  William Russell ATKINS
  3. +Susan Russell ATKINS

    __
 __|
|  |__
|
|--John T. ATKINS 
|
|   __
|__|
   |__

INDEX


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Evelyn BAUER

Father: Rudolph BAUER
Mother: Elizabeth MICHLIG

Family 1: Charles Page BERG

  1.  Donald A. BERG
  2.  James J. BERG
  3.  Elizabeth BERG
  4.  Charles B. BERG

                      _Frank X. BAUER ____
 _Rudolph BAUER _____|
|                    |_Mary Ann SIPPLE ___
|
|--Evelyn BAUER 
|
|                     _Joseph MICHLIG ____
|_Elizabeth MICHLIG _|
                     |_Crescentia IMHOFF _

INDEX

Notes

still living - details excluded


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Margaret EDGAR

Family 1: Thomas JOHNSTON
  1.  Elizabeth JOHNSTON

    __
 __|
|  |__
|
|--Margaret EDGAR 
|
|   __
|__|
   |__

INDEX


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Lee M. ELLENBECKER

Father: Jerome ELLENBECKER
Mother: Marie KARLEN


                       ________________
 _Jerome ELLENBECKER _|
|                     |________________
|
|--Lee M. ELLENBECKER 
|
|                      _Victor KARLEN _
|_Marie KARLEN _______|
                      |_Rose HEIL _____

INDEX


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William GETZE

Father: Frank GETZE
Mother: Margaret Appollonia WERNER


                               ________________________
 _Frank GETZE ________________|
|                             |________________________
|
|--William GETZE 
|
|                              _Andreas WERNER ________
|_Margaret Appollonia WERNER _|
                              |_Gertrude WASSERBURGER _

INDEX


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Ila Vernice HARRIS

Family 1: Paul D. WERNER
  1. +James Donald WERNER
  2. +Patricia Ann WERNER

    __
 __|
|  |__
|
|--Ila Vernice HARRIS 
|
|   __
|__|
   |__

INDEX


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Harry ISBELL

Family 1: Susan ALLISON


    __
 __|
|  |__
|
|--Harry ISBELL 
|
|   __
|__|
   |__

INDEX


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Myrtle PARKER

Father: William PARKER
Mother: Phoebe TRAVIS

Family 1: Owen J. GERRISH


                   ____________________
 _William PARKER _|
|                 |____________________
|
|--Myrtle PARKER 
|
|                  _Peter TRAVIS ______
|_Phoebe TRAVIS __|
                  |_Elizabeth KEARNEY _

INDEX


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Johann PERREN

Family 1: Maria Josepha MICHLIG


    __
 __|
|  |__
|
|--Johann PERREN 
|
|   __
|__|
   |__

INDEX


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Zandra POCOCK

Family 1: David Charlton READER

  1.  Michelle READER
  2.  Amanda READER
  3.  Hayley Zandra Louise READER

    __
 __|
|  |__
|
|--Zandra POCOCK 
|
|   __
|__|
   |__

INDEX


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Laura PROBST

Family 1: Henry WERNER
  1.  Mary Ann WERNER
  2.  Peter WERNER
  3.  Georgeann WERNER
  4.  Peter WERNER

    __
 __|
|  |__
|
|--Laura PROBST 
|
|   __
|__|
   |__

INDEX


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Nicolas SEIVERS

Family 1: Gertrude MICHELS
  1. +Nicholas SEIVERS
  2. +Peter Martin SEIVERS

    __
 __|
|  |__
|
|--Nicolas SEIVERS 
|
|   __
|__|
   |__

INDEX

Notes

This is for Nicolas Seivers 2 sons:

From: "Who's Who in American History"
-----------------------------------------------------
SERIVERS, NICHOLAS and PETER, Washington Pioneers --- There is probably no better known or more highly respected name in the Big Bend country of Washington State than that of Seivers. Nicholas and Peter Serivers, with their father, also Nicholas,
were the pioneers of Lind, homesteading there at its beginning, holding their own in the early, disheartening years, climbing by the power of their own achievements until they became the civic and financial leaders of the region. In an absolute sense,
the brothers were partners, even to the extent of keeping a joint bank account and they and their families sharing the great house that was the climax of several homes built from time to time, each larger than the other and each equipped with the last
word in utilities and furnishings. Their story is one of the epic tales of the Pacific Northwest which takes on added interest with the mellowing effects of age.
Nicholas and Peter were the sons of Nicholas and Gertrude (Michaels) Seivers, born natives of Germany, the former born in Leipzig, and Gertrude Michaels in Breslau. Nicholas Jr., the son, was born in La Porte, Indiana, December 21, 1871 and died
on the huge Seivers' farm, near Lind, Washington, on December 18, 1925. Peter was born at Marathon, Wisconsin, February 14, 1873, and died in Spokane, Washington, March 14, 1937. Nicholas Seivers Sr. came to the United States as a young man and for
the most part was interested in agriculture throughout his life. Like many who came from abroad during that period, seeking the land that they could not acquire in their own countries, he found that the homesteads available in the Middle West required
a great deal of taming before they would produce, and that getting the products to market often used up all the possible profits. The family grew larger in Indiana and Wisconsin and became desperately poor. Schooling was hard to obtain by the
children, for the little district school was often far away from the farm, and only during the winter months could they be spared from home tasks. Their education in the "School of Hard Knocks" proved adequate, and fitted all for responsibilities that
came later.
After the end of the War Between the States, and more particularly after the "Centennial Exhibition" at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1876, the Pacific Northwest received a great deal of advertising, by word of mouth, concerning its fertile areas
and immense amounts of government land that could be entered upon with a few formalities. It was rumored that even the most barren appearing soil could be made to produce vast crops of wheat. In the spring of 1889, the elder Nicholas Seivers and his
sons, Nicholas and Peter, went to the Far West, and persuaded by what they had heard of the Big Bend country in Washington, decided to locate there. Arriving at Walla Walla, in what was then Washington Territory, the three procured a team and wagon
and traveled the dusty sagebrush to a site nine miles southeast of Lind, a hamlet started only some months earlier. As far as the eye could reach was bare plain, grey with sagebrush and bunch grass, without roads or fences. It stood out in sharp
contrast with the lush greens of the Wisconsin farm -- but they took up a homestead, built a small "shack" and lived on "sow belly and sour dough" bread, while they fought to subdue the drab dry land to the growing of a crop of grain and a few food
supplies. In these softer days, it is almost impossible to realize and appreciate the vision, courage and capacity for extreme hard work that inspired the endeavors of these pioneers of some sixty years ago.
The Seivers cultivated some of their acres and seemed likely to get ahead when a man-made enemy threatened to cause the loss of all they had achieved. It was the time of the closing of the open range for cattle, whose owners refused to abandon
what they considered their rights. The first crop of wheat and corn of the Seivers and many other homesteaders was destroyed by wandering livestock. There were years of conflict between the cattlemen and the "sod-busters" as they called the farmers.
Many of the pioneers moved away, beaten in the battle between lawless men and unrelenting nature. The gophers at this time were a dread scourge to the farmers. For a couple of years there was a lively contest between the settlers and the pests. The
Seivers clung to their hardly won advantages, however, and increased their holdings with the years. Actual want was overcome, and clothing and housing became less sketchy. Then and later, there were lean years when even the meagre rainfall all but
failed. It was a decade before an assured victory could be claimed, when people came from far and wide to find out the secret of successful agriculture in this region, to learn and copy the methods they had involved. In the meanwhile, the boys had
matured. Nicholas, Jr., was about eighteen when he first came to the Big Bend country, and Peter about sixteen. They now had taken over largely the actual management of the place, which by 1908 exceeded twenty-eight hundred acres. Both had married
by 1910.
The young rise on the shoulders of experienced fathers, but they in turn must climb still higher by new and larger ideas and undertakings. The Seivers were among the first in this land to use more and more mechanical aids to agriculture. The
innovations cost large sums, some were still in the experimental stage, especially those utilizing gasoline power; and the question of keeping machinery in repair so far distant from any large center was a genuine obstacle. Eventually, practically all
horse-work was discarded for more efficient and speedy methods. To solve one problem, more than thirty years ago, the Seivers built a large repair shop. A Lind newspaper of 1908 says that it was forty-five by sixty feet, equipped with expensive
turning lathes, double action steam hammer, forges, drill presses and other machinery. The Seivers learned to handle all this equipment themselves by study and experience becoming expert machinists. Later, also, the shop was greatly enlarged and
people from the surrounding territory brought in their repairs to be done. This shop today contains about $30,000.00 worth of precision tools and equipment.
In the meanwhile, all kinds of other buildings were being constructed, for a big farm requires many buildings. Unlike some agriculturalists, the Seivers did not believe in great barns and small homes. The original shack had soon been replaced by
a liveable place. Then an eleven-room house was erected, and as the families increased and wealth was accumulated, what the Virginia farmer would call "the great house" was built with its twenty rooms and every necessity and luxury possible.
Incidentally, the Seivers' place had its own electric plant before there was one in nearby Lind. The farm, now comprising some four thousand acres, is still owned and operated by members of the family.
Marriage drew the ties of the Seivers even closer together. On January 8, 1905, Nicholas Jr. returned to Marathon, Wisconsin and married Elizabeth Margaret Werner, daughter of John and Caroline (Heil) Werner. Her father farmed in Marathon County
for many years and had been sheriff of the county for some time. Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Seivers, Jr., were the parents of three children: 1. Nicholas III, born June 1, 1906; married, October 25, 1927, Irene Connors, and they have two children: i.
Dolores, born June 7, 1928. ii. Nicholas, born August 3, 1931. Nicholas Serivers, III, was born on the farm, attended the Lind High School and then was associated with his father and uncle in the operation of the place. Under his father's tutelage,
he became and expert machinist as well as efficient farm manager and operator. Since 1929 he has operated the ranch and is a worthy successor to Nicholas and Peter Seivers. 2. Elizabeth, born August 23, 1907, who married, on July 29, 1932, Dan
Coughlin, of Butte, Montana. 3. John, born August 17, 1914, is a Spokane business man. All of the children were born in Lind.
During the winter of 1909-10, Peter Seivers also returned to Marathon, Wisconsin, and on April 27, 1910, married a sister of his brother's wife, Emma Marie Werner. Peter and Emma Marie (Werner) Seivers became the parents of three children: 1.
Margaret, born at Lind, December 26, 1916. 2. William Peter, born at Lind, July 22, 1918. 3. Dorothy Ann, born at Lind, March 10, 1929.
As already noted, Nicholas Seivers, Jr. died on December 18, 1925, while Peter Seivers lived to March 14, 1937, and thus came to an end the careers of two of the pioneer builders of the Big Bend country. Their major service was, no doubt, the
showing to others how to make the most of the natural resources of the region. But their contributions to its development did not end with this. Their influence was always wielded for the best interests of the community, yet without seeking political
preferment or power. They served on school boards and in minor capacities, but steadfastly declined to accept any higher offices. When the United States entered the World War, they were quick to show their patriotism and to lend a hand in the efforts
to raise funds for humanitarian agencies such as the Red Cross Society and the Knights of Columbus. When, in recent years, financial depression hit the country many staggering blows, the Seivers brothers, according to local bankers, saved the Bank of
Lind from closing its doors by refusing to draw out their large deposits, an example which encouraged others to follow in their footsteps. They were devout Catholics, and in the early days, Mass was held in their home, and ultimately, they established
the fund for the building of a church. It was mainly through their efforts and those of the sisters, that an edifice was erected and regular services held. St. Ambrose Church, in Lind, is largely a monument to the life and labors of every member of
the Seivers family. The Big Bend country now enjoys a wide renown as a grain growing region. There were no more outstanding factors in this eminent achievement than the Seivers brothers, Nicholas Jr. and Peter.


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